The Aviator

It’s late as most people reckon things, but I have to post this. I just saw The Aviator. Amazing. Absolutely amazing. I’m a pretty big fan of aviation anyway, and I know a lot of it’s history, but Howard Hughes was so critical to how we see aviation today, it cannot be overstated. Yes, the airlines have problems. Hell, the two airlines that started it all, Pan Am and TWA are both history. TWA was Hughes’ airline, and frankly, he probably revolved in his grave when it died. If you want to know more about the history of aviation, it, like all things good, can be found online. Full disclosure: My father is a pilot, as is my grandfather and my grandmother, and if I’m not mistaken, a few cousins are as well. I am not, as I prefer to be served free booze from micro-bottles while relaxing in the air. I did, however, work at Garrett Aviation for about two years, which was interesting, as it spanned the events of September 11, 2001.

But I digress. History is one thing, the movie is another – usually. I know that there are parts that are made up or insinuated from half- or less-than-half-known facts. Regardless, this movie was fantastic. Amazing set work, visual design, everything, gave us, the audience, a chance to be there. It was amazing!

Alan Alda was breath-taking as the senator from Maine that was owned by Pan Am. His role should earn him many awards, the highest, of course, being right of first refusal of every male character aged 50 and over.

Leonardo DiCaprio was stunning in his portrayal of Hughes. We all know from our history that Hughes was eccentric, and if you’ve done any study of him, you’ve heard about OCD and some others. I would guess, purely non-clinical of course, that it was a combination of OCD and Aspergere’s Syndrome that afflicted Hughes. Again, regardless of what exactly it was, Leo was phenomenal. He deserves many more roles, and I’m not a huge fan of his. At least, I wasn’t. Although, thinking on it, I did enjoy The Basketball Diaries, but I’m almost positive that was because of the masturbation-on-the-roof-with-the-New York-skyline scene.

Cate Blanchette. There is only one word: BrilliantFantasticAmazingStunningWOW. Trust me, it’s a word. It’s the only one you can use to describe her as Kathryn Hepburn. Cate as Kate was brilliant casting, and Cate captured the stiff-spined and unflinching spirit of Kate and brought her full bloom to the screen. Every moment Cate was there, Kate was there, and we were taken back to the Hollywood she so loved and loathed. If ever a biopic of Kate is made and Cate isn’t cast in the role, I will personally stage a boycott. There is no way to describe this in words, you must see it. I thought Elizabeth was the role of her career, even though Cate has done some great work since. I now know that I was mistaken, and she’s just getting started.

There were a myriad of other fine actors and actresses in this movie. I will be buying this on DVD, but I suggest you don’t wait till then to see it. I’ve heard the movie dismissed by someone saying “I don’t care to see a movie about how a rich man learned to fly” and frankly, if you feel that way, you’re wrong. You can’t judge a book by it’s cover, nor a movie by it’s subject.

Which is why I’m going to go see Hotel Rwanda as soon as it shows up here.