Power to the People

Sometimes we forget that the smallest states have a rather large power-base that is not compromised by the largest populations that are scattered around the country. Currently, I live in a frickin’ city that is nearly 8 times the population of the State of Maine, where I used to live. My current NEIGHBORHOOD in the SUBURBS has over TWICE THE PEOPLE of Caribou! Sometimes it just amazes me, but other times I still think “WTF? Why do they live in Maine?”

But then, something wonderful happens, and you realize that Maine is pretty damn cool for several reasons. Not the least of which are the wonderful people that have all worked at ATX, throughout it’s nearly 15 years in business.

Today, however, Susan Collins, one of the two Senators from Maine, has begun the process of investigating why, after spending billions of dollars to create the Department of Homeland Security were we unable to actually mobilize in time to positively affect the level of destruction we predicted would be caused by Katrina.

In case you don’t have a clue as to how the Senate determines power, it’s on two levels. The first is that every state in the U.S. has two senators, no more, no less, and that means that a state with a population of less than a million people has the same power as a state with 50 Million people – at least, that’s the first part of the power.

The second, and more intriguing part of the power of Senators is their longevity in office. The longer in office, the higher their power – until they screw up and praise someone for being a racist prick, of course. So that means that by being consistent in choosing even just OK people to represent their state in the Senate, small states can end up with Amazing Power. Maine’s Senators Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins have not been in the Senate for very long, having been first elected to the Senate in 1994 and 1996 respectively, however that means they’ve both been re-elected and have the confidence of the state. They are both admirable women who work very hard to get what they want, which you have to admire even if you disagree with their stance. And the longer they are in the Senate, the more powerful and therefore influential they will become – and that is generally a good thing for Maine.

2 comments

  1. Let’s see… Before 9/11 we had 20+ dysfunctional bureaucracies that have since been combined into one massively giant dysfunctional bureaucracy, and we have to spend billions of dollars to figure out why it’s dysfunctional. Duh. Bigger is not better. But you won’t hear anyone in Congress who voted to create DHS accept any blame for the screw-ups.

  2. And they can work well with the other party, as they evidenced in the BRAC experience.
    Peace,
    Tor

Comments are closed.