More filming the show

Sorry, I realize it’s been more than a week, but a lot has been going on and I haven’t had a chance to really work on the blog post to complete how Closed Captioning is done because, well, it all changed.

For the better.

I will, however, recap what I had to deal with before. MovCaptioner is a lovely piece of software, but it had it’s moments of insanity that would require multiple exports, changes, edits, and re-exports, until you got a version that worked. That’s all gone. Where I had a day that included, I kid you not, 23 different versions of the captioning file, the MovCaptioner software now error corrects and fixes itself so well that it works on the first export.

Plus, I’ve changed how I edit the show. In fact, it’s much cleaner now, although there are still parts that are a bit odd.

Here’s what a timeline used to look like for a completed show:

And here’s what it looks like now, for the completed show:

Isn’t that much nicer? The real reason for this is that we have a rundown of how to film what we film. That timing sheet basically gives me a map to create segments that we can then surround with commercials. It gives me the ability to create these:

And those six segments are our show. Because I can create these segments, and then nest them into the final show, I can also send out the audio from each segment as I drop and crop bits into it and get transcriptions done while I’m polishing my edits, fixing audio levels, adding in b-roll, whatever. It’s taken my work day back down to 8 hours instead of 14 with captioning. Which is great.

When I don’t have to caption a show, I can edit and finalize it in under 5 hours. Captioning is still taking an extra 3 hours, and I want to get it down to just an hour, as that’s reasonable to me. I think I can, given some practice, but working an 8 hour day won’t kill me.

If you want to know more about MovieCaptioner, or have any questions, let me know in the comments.